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All About Speed Limits On UK Roads

Different roads have varying speed limits, depending on traffic conditions and pedestrian traffic. For a new driver, it can become a bit difficult to comprehend speed limitations in case they land on an unknown road. On most roads, the speed limits are displayed on boards, enclosed in a red circle.

Alternately, some signs are characterised by white numbers written within a blue circle. These are frequently used to direct cars propelling towards the entrance of a tunnel or underpass. The speed limit is set to ensure that cars do not slow down while entering, as it can create a polluted hazard or traffic condition for the free-flowing tunnel traffic. If you’re still confused about what speed to use for different roads, you can consider getting refresher driving lessons from a London driving school.

Speed Limits On Different Types Of Roads:

The defined speed limit for built-up areas is 30 miles per hour. In rare cases, road signs indicate something below this limit due to possible hazards like cyclists, road crossing or the presence of children or the elderly. In order to minimise danger on these roads, you need to be extra careful about your vehicle’s speed so as not to harm yourself or the pedestrians around you.

If we talk about single carriage roads, with no existing barriers to separate incoming and outgoing traffic, the speed limit can be extended to up to 60 miles per hour. They operate differently to double carriage roads, which are open to speeds of up to 70 miles per hour. You must, however, keep an eye out for any road signs that indicate otherwise. If you’re driving on motorways or roads which are meant for long-distance travelling, then the speed limit automatically climbs. But you should still be careful not to exceed it beyond 70 miles per hour.

3 Pointers To Remember:

Here are three things every driver in the UK should remember.

  1. All single and dual carriageways containing street lights follow a basic speed limit of 30 miles per hour. If you notice signs indicating a different instruction, you can disregard the 30 mph rule.
  2. Driving at high speeds widens the time between a brake and the complete halt of the vehicle. You can not stop immediately if your car is speeding. Consequently, the chances of collision between your car and the car in front of you increase. Make sure to stay under speed limits to avoid such accidents.
  3. In different circumstances, you must adjust your speed. Depending upon the weather conditions and your own position, you are required to slow down or speed up to ensure your safety as well as the safety of those around you. For example, if you are towing a caravan or a trailer, you must slow down and maintain a significant distance from the vehicle for optimal safety.

What Are The Consequences Of Speeding?

Speeding is considered a serious offence by the traffic regulatory department. If you speed up, you will have to pay a fine, and lose penalty points. You may even get disqualified in case you are caught speeding up excessively. The fine starts from €100 and each speeding episode leads to the driver losing 3 penalty points.

Committing a more serious offence may lead to disqualification. You will also be asked to take a speed awareness course to ensure that you are not found doing the same mistake again. This theory-based workshop will equip you with knowledge on how to avoid speeding up on different roads.

Here is an ultimate guide to speed limits on UK roads. If you are a newbie to driving and are not sure of speed-related driving regulations, you can get in touch with a driving school to expand your knowledge. Champs Driving School is a leading company that houses multiple skilled instructors. We offer affordable driving courses in London, so first-timers, as well as beginners, are well-equipped with all driving-related knowledge

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